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Residential Windows, Doors and Skylights

Current Specification Effective Date: January 1, 2015

  • The current criteria were finalized in January 2014.
  • New performance levels (PDF, 238.86 KB) are effective as of January 1, 2016 for windows, doors, and skylights in all climate zones.
  • Windows, doors and skylights must meet U-Factor and, where applicable, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) requirements based on climate zone. In addition, doors must meet U-Factor and, where applicable, SHGC requirements based on glazing level (amount of glass).
  • Windows, doors and skylights originally qualified for the ENERGY STAR label in March, 1998.

What should I look for when buying windows, doors skylights?

Every ENERGY STAR window, door and skylight is independently certified and verified to perform at levels that meet or exceed energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. EPA. But how do you know which windows work in your climate? The following tips will help you buy with confidence.

Purchasing Tips

Shopping for new windows, doors, and skylights can be a confusing process. ENERGY STAR makes it simple! Follow these five tips to ensure your windows, doors, and skylights deliver savings and comfort you’ll enjoy.

Look for the ENERGY STAR label for your climate zone. All ENERGY STAR certified products must display the ENERGY STAR label. Check the label to make sure the product you are considering is certified to meet the criteria for your area. The ENERGY STAR label appears on the product next to the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label:

ENERGY STAR Qualified
in Highlighted Regions

Official ENERGY STAR label (and NFRC Label) for a window qualifying in the Northern and North-Central climate zones.

ENERGY STAR Qualified
in All 50 States

Ask for ENERGY STAR when ordering. When you’re ordering in a showroom, make sure to ask for a product that is certified to meet the ENERGY STAR criteria for your climate zone. You can choose ENERGY STAR certified windows in a variety of framing materials to suit your needs.

  • Get a deal. In addition to the long-term energy savings you’ll enjoy, you may be able to take advantage of financial incentives that lower your initial investment:
    • Many utilities provide financial incentives for purchasing ENERGY STAR certified windows, doors and skylights. Look for local rebates and other promotions in your area .
    • Claim federal tax credits for installing ENERGY STAR certified windows, doors or skylights or making certain other energy efficiency improvements to your home.
    • Keep in mind that the cost of complete window replacement can vary. Be sure to get quotes from several installers. Different dealers may quote difference prices for the same product. When interviewing contractors, ask them to break down the price quote by labor and materials. ENERGY STAR certified windows, doors and skylights may cost more than non-certified products, but the labor involved should be comparable for both.
    • If your house is older than 1978, be sure to look for contractors who are certified to handle lead paint .

  • Growing Marijuana Indoors, growing plants with led.#Growing #plants #with #led


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    Worlds Best Growing Marijuana Web Site!

    Growing plants with ledGrowing plants with led

    Growing Marijuana – Learning How To Grow Weed Your Step By Step Guide

    Growing Marijuana both indoors and outdoors is one the the fastest growing hobbies of people around the world. With laws, rules and legalization different in each country, state and city more people from beginners to professional weed growing horticulturists are growing pot. There is lots of free information online to teach you how to grow weed even if it is your first time growing. Step by step guides are available as a downloadable book or you can find weed forums that help you with easy hints and tips for growing inside or outside. If you are growing indoors in grow rooms such as a closet, attic, tent, basement or garage there is expert help for every aspect of growing. From seed selecting, to germination to cloning to drying there is plenty of information for how to grow marijuana for dummies.

    Growing plants with led

    Marijuana Growing Tips & Instructions for Beginners, Experts And Medical

    Medical marijuana growing is becoming very common for people who have medical conditions and are learning how to grow marijuana for personal use so they do not have to abuse their bodies with harmful prescription drugs. There are also many medical marijuana dispensaries located in countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia and other countries where the government allows you to grow not for profit but for legal reasons determined by your doctor. Although not recommended some people are starting to grow for profit and a living as the reality of the economy is difficult for many people. Another fast growing method is organic or natural horticulture of the marijuana plant where people grow indoors or outdoors without the use of fertilizer, pesticide or other chemicals.

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    From Germination to Soil To Flowing to Harvesting Our Tips Make It Easy

    Our online guide was created to help you with how to grow cannabis using natural methods, hints and advanced instructions for cannabis growing for beginners, experts and medical marijuana growers. Growing weed can be easy if you have the best supplies to do the job as natural as possible. Some of the supplies you will need is soil, lighting, fertilizer, aerogarden, flourescent or led lights, hydroponics and a grow room. The weed plant can be easy to grow if you can avoid some of the small problems that might occur such as disease, fungus, pests, bugs, spider mites and frost. Questions such as the various pot plant stages, clones and cloning the ganja plant as well as smell, flowering times and harvesting can be explained in detail with the growing marijuana e book.

    Growing plants with led

    Growing Help For Indoors, Outdoors, Home, Closet, Greenhouse Tent.

    There are many locations for starting to grow marijuana for both inside and outside. Your grow room setup is the most important part before you start your plants from seeds or clones. You need to have the best supplies and materials as well as the proper space in your room. Some other things you need to consider before you start growing weed besides the legal laws is the smell, the electricty, hydroponics, nutrients, grow lights, humidity, temperature the time it takes for flowering of the buds. Before any beginner starts growing pot you should look for videos, forums, books, pictures and guides for easy step by step instructions for growing weed for medical or personal use.

    Growing plants with led

    The Laws for Growing Marijuana Keep Changing. Legal status in your Area

    The laws and legal status for growing marijuana are changing each year around the world. While there is still harsh punishments for growing this plant that is safer than alchol and has never caused a single death the laws and legality are changing fast. In the USA the United States has allowed medical marijuana growing in over 15 states including California, Washington and Nevada. Other countries like Canada allow you to grow for personal use with government issued permission. Dispensaries in areas such as California require you to get a medical marijuana card that allows you to grow a certain amount of plants. The cost of growing equipment will vary in the area you live such as lights and hyroponics. We suggest that you review prices on items such as grow lights, aeroponics, fluorescent lights, cfl, fertilizer and nutrients. It is not always best to buy cheap supplies when you begin growing pot indoors.


    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps – The New York Times #40 #dating #singles


    #online dating apps

    #

    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps

    And there are others with variations on the theme, including How About We. where you pose an idea for a fun date and see who bites, and the League, sort of a mobile dating app for the 1 percent: it promotes exclusivity and a carefully selected clientele .

    “Because there’s such an increase in smartphone usage, it directly relates to the increase in dating app usage,” said Julie Spira, an online dating guru who runs a site called Cyber-Dating Expert. “People are dating on the fly, they’re dating in real time, they’re hooking up or meeting for dates, they’re doing both. Same day, same hour.”

    It’s easier, faster and more discreet to swipe through an app than to create laborious online profiles. The downside of that convenience is uncertainty, since mobile profiles tend to be sparse or nonexistent.

    Still, this simplicity has caused Tinder’s growth to explode in just two years. According to the company, it processes more than one billion swipes a day and matches some 12 million people a day. A “match” means two people agreed they were interested in one another. From there, they can choose whether to exchange messages or meet in person.

    Traditional dating sites like Match.com, eHarmony and OkCupid also have apps that let their users keep tabs on their profiles, messages and matches, of course. In fact Tinder, Match and OkCupid, among other dating sites, are all part of the IAC/InterActiveCorp media conglomerate.

    Amarnath Thombre, president of Match.com in North America, said that in the last year it had registered a 35 percent increase in the people who use Match through the app each month, and a 109 percent increase in the number of people who use only the app to reach Match every month. But he acknowledged that Tinder was creating an entirely new audience of digital daters.

    “What Tinder especially has accomplished, which I think none of our competitors could achieve before, is that it opened up this young demographic — 18- to 25-year-olds — that no product could open up before,” Mr. Thombre said.

    While Tinder, which may eventually add a premium service for a fee, has had a reputation as a way to find casual encounters, it appears to be moving beyond that. I found plenty of people my own age using the app, including quite a few friends and acquaintances. And some are even finding love on Tinder.

    “I heard about Tinder in a funny, joking, laugh-about-it way,” said Sara Chamberlin, a 31-year-old marketing manager in San Francisco. “But I started hearing that friends of mine had met significant others on this app, and I thought, maybe it’s not just this hookup thing. It’s for finding relationships.”

    Ms. Chamberlin met her boyfriend on Tinder. They’ve been dating about a year, she said, and are preparing to move in together.

    “The thing that I appreciated the most was efficiency, and just the lack of pressure to come up with this persona,” she said. “The very thing that made it feel seedy and not like a good idea is the exact reason I liked it so much — how casual it was.”

    Tinder is indeed easy, casual and fun. In the interest of, ahem, research, I set up profiles on Tinder and then one on OkCupid, the popular free online dating site, as well as Match.com .

    To use Tinder, you must have a Facebook account. Most Facebook profiles are tied to real identities and real names, and the app shows you if you have friends in common.

    To set up a profile, you log in using your Facebook credentials and then choose a few photos from the collection you have on the site. Tinder will automatically fill in a few for you. Then, you enter a short bio — or leave it blank, as some people do when they’re relying solely on their looks.

    After that short setup, which takes just a few minutes depending on how much time you spend writing your profile or choosing photos, you can set search parameters like distance from you, age and gender. And then you just start swiping through pictures of potential matches. You tap one for more information, and if you like them, swipe right. If you want to move on, swipe left.

    If you match with someone — you both swipe right — you see a little pop-up that says you can either send a message or “keep playing.” In that way, Tinder really is like a game.

    One thing I particularly liked about Tinder: no one can send you a message unless you both like each other. It’s an instant filter.

    Setting up an OkCupid profile is significantly more work and requires much more personal information. The first step — choosing a profile name — is a stumper. Between all the names that are already taken and the myriad sites offering advice on choosing an effective one, it might be easier to just use your name.

    OkCupid also wants users to answer up to thousands of questions so it can narrow down matches with greater accuracy. Match.com doesn’t have page after page of questions, but does push you to add more and more information to your profile.

    Then there are the long profiles of potential matches to read, messages to sift through or delete, and a barrage of communication from the sites themselves. Managing an online dating profile can feel like a full-time job; Tinder is more like a little hobby.

    However, Ms. Spira, the online dating expert, says that people who use Tinder are also using other dating sites, sometimes even paying for memberships. Mr. Thombre confirmed that many Tinder users were also Match or OkCupid users, either at the same time or after they give up on one and move on to the next.

    And Ms. Spira said that having easy access to lots of different dates actually increases your odds of eventually finding a match.

    “It’s making dates happen a lot more quickly,” she said. “The more dates you go on, the better dater you become, so let mobile dating apps become your new best friend.”

    An article in the Personal Tech pages on Thursday about dating apps misstated, in some copies, the surname of an online dating guru in two instances. She is Julie Spira, not Stira.

    A version of this article appears in print on February 5, 2015, on page B8 of the New York edition with the headline: Led by Tinder, the Mobile Dating Game Surges. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle – The New York Times #e #dating


    #matchmakers

    #

    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle

    Raised in Detroit, Ms. Weinberg made her first match as a young woman in New York, where her mother had suggested that she move to find a mate. In 1976, as Ms. Weinberg recalled, an older friend, dedicated to matchmaking, asked Ms. Weinberg to help organize a singles party.

    “At the party,” Ms. Weinberg said, “I meet this girl named Debbie, and I said, ‘You don’t know me, but I have this feeling you’d be perfect for my friend Mark Goldenberg.’ ” The woman was reluctant to meet a stranger. “There were so many hijackings, there was David Berkowitz,” the Son of Sam killer. “She said, ‘How do I know you’re not a mass murderer?’ I got on my hands and knees and said, ‘Do me a favor and have dinner with him.’ ”

    The day after the couple’s first date, Ms. Weinberg heard from the man. “He called me and said, ‘I’m going to marry her.’ And they just married off their last child.”

    Ms. Weinberg did find a husband for herself in New York, too. They moved to Pittsburgh for his work as a doctor, and she practiced dentistry for a time, but continued to make matches on the side. It became more than a hobby.

    “There was so much intermarriage in Pittsburgh, I felt I had to do something,” she said. “I started talking to all these women’s organizations. I said: ‘Listen, I have men! My husband knows all these residents and interns. Give me your daughters, I have the boys!’ ”

    Ms. Weinberg, who has five children and 15 grandchildren, is an observant Jew of the Modern Orthodox persuasion. She does not work or use electricity on the Sabbath, but nor does she cover her hair, as more strictly observant women do. There are dozens of other Jewish matchmakers, but most primarily serve Orthodox Jews, and many charge for their services. Ms. Weinberg is unusual for working with all branches of Judaism, and for refusing money.

    “Baruch Hashem” — blessed is God’s name — “my husband makes a lot of money, so I can do this for free,” Ms. Weinberg said. A conversation with her involves a lot of listening; a lot of Baruch Hashems; and talk of finding one’s bashert, one’s destiny, or soul mate.

    In 2004, investors approached her and asked her to help them start SawYouAtSinai.com, which uses matchmakers to pair members. When I visited Ms. Weinberg last week, the website had 18,344 members and 355 matchmakers, including Ms. Weinberg. On SawYouAtSinai.com, members can see only those profiles of other members suggested by the site’s matchmakers.

    Tova Weinberg long ago left her career as a dentist. Credit Jeff Swensen for The New York Times

    One of her primary tasks, on the website and for her private clientele, is to help singles be less picky, Ms. Weinberg said.

    One frequent mistake she sees is “looking for something they think their parents want them to have,” she said. “And thinking they can’t compromise, like on religion: ‘I have to have somebody who is superreligious and learns all day long,’ or, ‘I have to have somebody who eats shellfish out, but is Jewish.’ ”

    Women can be superficial — “A lot of women don’t like bald men,” Ms. Weinberg said — but men are worse. “I’ll have a singles party, they’ll come into the room, look around, say, ‘Bye!’ They don’t even get to know anybody. They don’t look at the neshama,” the soul, she said.

    Some of the men have mommy issues, too.

    “I have this one man,” Ms. Weinberg said, “whose mother used to be a ballerina, so he is looking for a woman with long legs, no chest. And he’s a rabbi!”

    Ms. Weinberg will work with any client as long as he or she is Jewish by the traditional standard of maternal descent: “I work with everyone whose mother is Jewish. The father could be the pope.” And she will work with clients who are gay, as long as they are looking for a straight marriage.

    “They have same-sex attraction,” Ms. Weinberg said, “but they don’t want to pursue that line. They want to marry a woman, and they want me to tell the girls they are homosexual but they don’t want to act on it.” Such a man “wants to have a normal house; he wants a house and a family.”

    And even for these men, Ms. Weinberg said, there are women.

    “I have to tell the woman” about the man’s situation, she said. “But there are women who are asexual, and there are women who don’t need to be — hugged and kissed, sure, but. ” She trailed off. “I have made matches like that.”

    Ms. Weinberg will take extraordinary measures to help put a man and woman together for life. She told one of her sons she would give him $10,000 if he found a husband for his sister, and he did. She will also take certain liberties in the service of love.

    “Something you should know about Tova is she creatively alters the truth under certain circumstances,” said Beverly Siegel. a documentary filmmaker from Chicago. Widowed after a long first marriage, Ms. Siegel met her second husband through Ms. Weinberg.

    “She told Howard some things about me that were not exactly true,” Ms. Siegel said. “She told him that I was 55, but I was 59. She told him I was willing to relocate. Howard was living in New York at the time. My feeling was when you say you are willing to relocate, it’s a matter of how much, it’s a negotiation. But she just said, ‘She’s willing to relocate.’ Period.”

    Ms. Weinberg also told Ms. Siegel that her prospective date, Howard Rieger, was “the most important Jew in North America.” Mr. Rieger was the president of United Jewish Communities, a national philanthropy, and so was one very important Jew. But Ms. Siegel now finds that description a bit dubious.

    “I think it’s safe to say he wasn’t the most important Jew in North America,” Ms. Siegel said of her second husband. But they were married in September 2008, five months after they started emailing, four months after their first date.

    “Tova is an amazingly talented woman,” Ms. Siegel said. “She is obsessed in a wonderful way.”

    A version of this article appears in print on August 16, 2014, on page A20 of the New York edition with the headline: A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps – The New York Times #dating #sites #denmark


    #online dating apps

    #

    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps

    And there are others with variations on the theme, including How About We. where you pose an idea for a fun date and see who bites, and the League, sort of a mobile dating app for the 1 percent: it promotes exclusivity and a carefully selected clientele .

    “Because there’s such an increase in smartphone usage, it directly relates to the increase in dating app usage,” said Julie Spira, an online dating guru who runs a site called Cyber-Dating Expert. “People are dating on the fly, they’re dating in real time, they’re hooking up or meeting for dates, they’re doing both. Same day, same hour.”

    It’s easier, faster and more discreet to swipe through an app than to create laborious online profiles. The downside of that convenience is uncertainty, since mobile profiles tend to be sparse or nonexistent.

    Still, this simplicity has caused Tinder’s growth to explode in just two years. According to the company, it processes more than one billion swipes a day and matches some 12 million people a day. A “match” means two people agreed they were interested in one another. From there, they can choose whether to exchange messages or meet in person.

    Traditional dating sites like Match.com, eHarmony and OkCupid also have apps that let their users keep tabs on their profiles, messages and matches, of course. In fact Tinder, Match and OkCupid, among other dating sites, are all part of the IAC/InterActiveCorp media conglomerate.

    Amarnath Thombre, president of Match.com in North America, said that in the last year it had registered a 35 percent increase in the people who use Match through the app each month, and a 109 percent increase in the number of people who use only the app to reach Match every month. But he acknowledged that Tinder was creating an entirely new audience of digital daters.

    “What Tinder especially has accomplished, which I think none of our competitors could achieve before, is that it opened up this young demographic — 18- to 25-year-olds — that no product could open up before,” Mr. Thombre said.

    While Tinder, which may eventually add a premium service for a fee, has had a reputation as a way to find casual encounters, it appears to be moving beyond that. I found plenty of people my own age using the app, including quite a few friends and acquaintances. And some are even finding love on Tinder.

    “I heard about Tinder in a funny, joking, laugh-about-it way,” said Sara Chamberlin, a 31-year-old marketing manager in San Francisco. “But I started hearing that friends of mine had met significant others on this app, and I thought, maybe it’s not just this hookup thing. It’s for finding relationships.”

    Ms. Chamberlin met her boyfriend on Tinder. They’ve been dating about a year, she said, and are preparing to move in together.

    “The thing that I appreciated the most was efficiency, and just the lack of pressure to come up with this persona,” she said. “The very thing that made it feel seedy and not like a good idea is the exact reason I liked it so much — how casual it was.”

    Tinder is indeed easy, casual and fun. In the interest of, ahem, research, I set up profiles on Tinder and then one on OkCupid, the popular free online dating site, as well as Match.com .

    To use Tinder, you must have a Facebook account. Most Facebook profiles are tied to real identities and real names, and the app shows you if you have friends in common.

    To set up a profile, you log in using your Facebook credentials and then choose a few photos from the collection you have on the site. Tinder will automatically fill in a few for you. Then, you enter a short bio — or leave it blank, as some people do when they’re relying solely on their looks.

    After that short setup, which takes just a few minutes depending on how much time you spend writing your profile or choosing photos, you can set search parameters like distance from you, age and gender. And then you just start swiping through pictures of potential matches. You tap one for more information, and if you like them, swipe right. If you want to move on, swipe left.

    If you match with someone — you both swipe right — you see a little pop-up that says you can either send a message or “keep playing.” In that way, Tinder really is like a game.

    One thing I particularly liked about Tinder: no one can send you a message unless you both like each other. It’s an instant filter.

    Setting up an OkCupid profile is significantly more work and requires much more personal information. The first step — choosing a profile name — is a stumper. Between all the names that are already taken and the myriad sites offering advice on choosing an effective one, it might be easier to just use your name.

    OkCupid also wants users to answer up to thousands of questions so it can narrow down matches with greater accuracy. Match.com doesn’t have page after page of questions, but does push you to add more and more information to your profile.

    Then there are the long profiles of potential matches to read, messages to sift through or delete, and a barrage of communication from the sites themselves. Managing an online dating profile can feel like a full-time job; Tinder is more like a little hobby.

    However, Ms. Spira, the online dating expert, says that people who use Tinder are also using other dating sites, sometimes even paying for memberships. Mr. Thombre confirmed that many Tinder users were also Match or OkCupid users, either at the same time or after they give up on one and move on to the next.

    And Ms. Spira said that having easy access to lots of different dates actually increases your odds of eventually finding a match.

    “It’s making dates happen a lot more quickly,” she said. “The more dates you go on, the better dater you become, so let mobile dating apps become your new best friend.”

    An article in the Personal Tech pages on Thursday about dating apps misstated, in some copies, the surname of an online dating guru in two instances. She is Julie Spira, not Stira.

    A version of this article appears in print on February 5, 2015, on page B8 of the New York edition with the headline: Led by Tinder, the Mobile Dating Game Surges. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle – The New York Times #40 #dating


    #matchmakers

    #

    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle

    Raised in Detroit, Ms. Weinberg made her first match as a young woman in New York, where her mother had suggested that she move to find a mate. In 1976, as Ms. Weinberg recalled, an older friend, dedicated to matchmaking, asked Ms. Weinberg to help organize a singles party.

    “At the party,” Ms. Weinberg said, “I meet this girl named Debbie, and I said, ‘You don’t know me, but I have this feeling you’d be perfect for my friend Mark Goldenberg.’ ” The woman was reluctant to meet a stranger. “There were so many hijackings, there was David Berkowitz,” the Son of Sam killer. “She said, ‘How do I know you’re not a mass murderer?’ I got on my hands and knees and said, ‘Do me a favor and have dinner with him.’ ”

    The day after the couple’s first date, Ms. Weinberg heard from the man. “He called me and said, ‘I’m going to marry her.’ And they just married off their last child.”

    Ms. Weinberg did find a husband for herself in New York, too. They moved to Pittsburgh for his work as a doctor, and she practiced dentistry for a time, but continued to make matches on the side. It became more than a hobby.

    “There was so much intermarriage in Pittsburgh, I felt I had to do something,” she said. “I started talking to all these women’s organizations. I said: ‘Listen, I have men! My husband knows all these residents and interns. Give me your daughters, I have the boys!’ ”

    Ms. Weinberg, who has five children and 15 grandchildren, is an observant Jew of the Modern Orthodox persuasion. She does not work or use electricity on the Sabbath, but nor does she cover her hair, as more strictly observant women do. There are dozens of other Jewish matchmakers, but most primarily serve Orthodox Jews, and many charge for their services. Ms. Weinberg is unusual for working with all branches of Judaism, and for refusing money.

    “Baruch Hashem” — blessed is God’s name — “my husband makes a lot of money, so I can do this for free,” Ms. Weinberg said. A conversation with her involves a lot of listening; a lot of Baruch Hashems; and talk of finding one’s bashert, one’s destiny, or soul mate.

    In 2004, investors approached her and asked her to help them start SawYouAtSinai.com, which uses matchmakers to pair members. When I visited Ms. Weinberg last week, the website had 18,344 members and 355 matchmakers, including Ms. Weinberg. On SawYouAtSinai.com, members can see only those profiles of other members suggested by the site’s matchmakers.

    Tova Weinberg long ago left her career as a dentist. Credit Jeff Swensen for The New York Times

    One of her primary tasks, on the website and for her private clientele, is to help singles be less picky, Ms. Weinberg said.

    One frequent mistake she sees is “looking for something they think their parents want them to have,” she said. “And thinking they can’t compromise, like on religion: ‘I have to have somebody who is superreligious and learns all day long,’ or, ‘I have to have somebody who eats shellfish out, but is Jewish.’ ”

    Women can be superficial — “A lot of women don’t like bald men,” Ms. Weinberg said — but men are worse. “I’ll have a singles party, they’ll come into the room, look around, say, ‘Bye!’ They don’t even get to know anybody. They don’t look at the neshama,” the soul, she said.

    Some of the men have mommy issues, too.

    “I have this one man,” Ms. Weinberg said, “whose mother used to be a ballerina, so he is looking for a woman with long legs, no chest. And he’s a rabbi!”

    Ms. Weinberg will work with any client as long as he or she is Jewish by the traditional standard of maternal descent: “I work with everyone whose mother is Jewish. The father could be the pope.” And she will work with clients who are gay, as long as they are looking for a straight marriage.

    “They have same-sex attraction,” Ms. Weinberg said, “but they don’t want to pursue that line. They want to marry a woman, and they want me to tell the girls they are homosexual but they don’t want to act on it.” Such a man “wants to have a normal house; he wants a house and a family.”

    And even for these men, Ms. Weinberg said, there are women.

    “I have to tell the woman” about the man’s situation, she said. “But there are women who are asexual, and there are women who don’t need to be — hugged and kissed, sure, but. ” She trailed off. “I have made matches like that.”

    Ms. Weinberg will take extraordinary measures to help put a man and woman together for life. She told one of her sons she would give him $10,000 if he found a husband for his sister, and he did. She will also take certain liberties in the service of love.

    “Something you should know about Tova is she creatively alters the truth under certain circumstances,” said Beverly Siegel. a documentary filmmaker from Chicago. Widowed after a long first marriage, Ms. Siegel met her second husband through Ms. Weinberg.

    “She told Howard some things about me that were not exactly true,” Ms. Siegel said. “She told him that I was 55, but I was 59. She told him I was willing to relocate. Howard was living in New York at the time. My feeling was when you say you are willing to relocate, it’s a matter of how much, it’s a negotiation. But she just said, ‘She’s willing to relocate.’ Period.”

    Ms. Weinberg also told Ms. Siegel that her prospective date, Howard Rieger, was “the most important Jew in North America.” Mr. Rieger was the president of United Jewish Communities, a national philanthropy, and so was one very important Jew. But Ms. Siegel now finds that description a bit dubious.

    “I think it’s safe to say he wasn’t the most important Jew in North America,” Ms. Siegel said of her second husband. But they were married in September 2008, five months after they started emailing, four months after their first date.

    “Tova is an amazingly talented woman,” Ms. Siegel said. “She is obsessed in a wonderful way.”

    A version of this article appears in print on August 16, 2014, on page A20 of the New York edition with the headline: A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps – The New York Times #50s #dating #sites


    #online dating apps

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    Led by Tinder, a Surge in Mobile Dating Apps

    And there are others with variations on the theme, including How About We. where you pose an idea for a fun date and see who bites, and the League, sort of a mobile dating app for the 1 percent: it promotes exclusivity and a carefully selected clientele .

    “Because there’s such an increase in smartphone usage, it directly relates to the increase in dating app usage,” said Julie Spira, an online dating guru who runs a site called Cyber-Dating Expert. “People are dating on the fly, they’re dating in real time, they’re hooking up or meeting for dates, they’re doing both. Same day, same hour.”

    It’s easier, faster and more discreet to swipe through an app than to create laborious online profiles. The downside of that convenience is uncertainty, since mobile profiles tend to be sparse or nonexistent.

    Still, this simplicity has caused Tinder’s growth to explode in just two years. According to the company, it processes more than one billion swipes a day and matches some 12 million people a day. A “match” means two people agreed they were interested in one another. From there, they can choose whether to exchange messages or meet in person.

    Traditional dating sites like Match.com, eHarmony and OkCupid also have apps that let their users keep tabs on their profiles, messages and matches, of course. In fact Tinder, Match and OkCupid, among other dating sites, are all part of the IAC/InterActiveCorp media conglomerate.

    Amarnath Thombre, president of Match.com in North America, said that in the last year it had registered a 35 percent increase in the people who use Match through the app each month, and a 109 percent increase in the number of people who use only the app to reach Match every month. But he acknowledged that Tinder was creating an entirely new audience of digital daters.

    “What Tinder especially has accomplished, which I think none of our competitors could achieve before, is that it opened up this young demographic — 18- to 25-year-olds — that no product could open up before,” Mr. Thombre said.

    While Tinder, which may eventually add a premium service for a fee, has had a reputation as a way to find casual encounters, it appears to be moving beyond that. I found plenty of people my own age using the app, including quite a few friends and acquaintances. And some are even finding love on Tinder.

    “I heard about Tinder in a funny, joking, laugh-about-it way,” said Sara Chamberlin, a 31-year-old marketing manager in San Francisco. “But I started hearing that friends of mine had met significant others on this app, and I thought, maybe it’s not just this hookup thing. It’s for finding relationships.”

    Ms. Chamberlin met her boyfriend on Tinder. They’ve been dating about a year, she said, and are preparing to move in together.

    “The thing that I appreciated the most was efficiency, and just the lack of pressure to come up with this persona,” she said. “The very thing that made it feel seedy and not like a good idea is the exact reason I liked it so much — how casual it was.”

    Tinder is indeed easy, casual and fun. In the interest of, ahem, research, I set up profiles on Tinder and then one on OkCupid, the popular free online dating site, as well as Match.com .

    To use Tinder, you must have a Facebook account. Most Facebook profiles are tied to real identities and real names, and the app shows you if you have friends in common.

    To set up a profile, you log in using your Facebook credentials and then choose a few photos from the collection you have on the site. Tinder will automatically fill in a few for you. Then, you enter a short bio — or leave it blank, as some people do when they’re relying solely on their looks.

    After that short setup, which takes just a few minutes depending on how much time you spend writing your profile or choosing photos, you can set search parameters like distance from you, age and gender. And then you just start swiping through pictures of potential matches. You tap one for more information, and if you like them, swipe right. If you want to move on, swipe left.

    If you match with someone — you both swipe right — you see a little pop-up that says you can either send a message or “keep playing.” In that way, Tinder really is like a game.

    One thing I particularly liked about Tinder: no one can send you a message unless you both like each other. It’s an instant filter.

    Setting up an OkCupid profile is significantly more work and requires much more personal information. The first step — choosing a profile name — is a stumper. Between all the names that are already taken and the myriad sites offering advice on choosing an effective one, it might be easier to just use your name.

    OkCupid also wants users to answer up to thousands of questions so it can narrow down matches with greater accuracy. Match.com doesn’t have page after page of questions, but does push you to add more and more information to your profile.

    Then there are the long profiles of potential matches to read, messages to sift through or delete, and a barrage of communication from the sites themselves. Managing an online dating profile can feel like a full-time job; Tinder is more like a little hobby.

    However, Ms. Spira, the online dating expert, says that people who use Tinder are also using other dating sites, sometimes even paying for memberships. Mr. Thombre confirmed that many Tinder users were also Match or OkCupid users, either at the same time or after they give up on one and move on to the next.

    And Ms. Spira said that having easy access to lots of different dates actually increases your odds of eventually finding a match.

    “It’s making dates happen a lot more quickly,” she said. “The more dates you go on, the better dater you become, so let mobile dating apps become your new best friend.”

    An article in the Personal Tech pages on Thursday about dating apps misstated, in some copies, the surname of an online dating guru in two instances. She is Julie Spira, not Stira.

    A version of this article appears in print on February 5, 2015, on page B8 of the New York edition with the headline: Led by Tinder, the Mobile Dating Game Surges. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle – The New York Times #la #dating


    #matchmakers

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    A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle

    Raised in Detroit, Ms. Weinberg made her first match as a young woman in New York, where her mother had suggested that she move to find a mate. In 1976, as Ms. Weinberg recalled, an older friend, dedicated to matchmaking, asked Ms. Weinberg to help organize a singles party.

    “At the party,” Ms. Weinberg said, “I meet this girl named Debbie, and I said, ‘You don’t know me, but I have this feeling you’d be perfect for my friend Mark Goldenberg.’ ” The woman was reluctant to meet a stranger. “There were so many hijackings, there was David Berkowitz,” the Son of Sam killer. “She said, ‘How do I know you’re not a mass murderer?’ I got on my hands and knees and said, ‘Do me a favor and have dinner with him.’ ”

    The day after the couple’s first date, Ms. Weinberg heard from the man. “He called me and said, ‘I’m going to marry her.’ And they just married off their last child.”

    Ms. Weinberg did find a husband for herself in New York, too. They moved to Pittsburgh for his work as a doctor, and she practiced dentistry for a time, but continued to make matches on the side. It became more than a hobby.

    “There was so much intermarriage in Pittsburgh, I felt I had to do something,” she said. “I started talking to all these women’s organizations. I said: ‘Listen, I have men! My husband knows all these residents and interns. Give me your daughters, I have the boys!’ ”

    Ms. Weinberg, who has five children and 15 grandchildren, is an observant Jew of the Modern Orthodox persuasion. She does not work or use electricity on the Sabbath, but nor does she cover her hair, as more strictly observant women do. There are dozens of other Jewish matchmakers, but most primarily serve Orthodox Jews, and many charge for their services. Ms. Weinberg is unusual for working with all branches of Judaism, and for refusing money.

    “Baruch Hashem” — blessed is God’s name — “my husband makes a lot of money, so I can do this for free,” Ms. Weinberg said. A conversation with her involves a lot of listening; a lot of Baruch Hashems; and talk of finding one’s bashert, one’s destiny, or soul mate.

    In 2004, investors approached her and asked her to help them start SawYouAtSinai.com, which uses matchmakers to pair members. When I visited Ms. Weinberg last week, the website had 18,344 members and 355 matchmakers, including Ms. Weinberg. On SawYouAtSinai.com, members can see only those profiles of other members suggested by the site’s matchmakers.

    Tova Weinberg long ago left her career as a dentist. Credit Jeff Swensen for The New York Times

    One of her primary tasks, on the website and for her private clientele, is to help singles be less picky, Ms. Weinberg said.

    One frequent mistake she sees is “looking for something they think their parents want them to have,” she said. “And thinking they can’t compromise, like on religion: ‘I have to have somebody who is superreligious and learns all day long,’ or, ‘I have to have somebody who eats shellfish out, but is Jewish.’ ”

    Women can be superficial — “A lot of women don’t like bald men,” Ms. Weinberg said — but men are worse. “I’ll have a singles party, they’ll come into the room, look around, say, ‘Bye!’ They don’t even get to know anybody. They don’t look at the neshama,” the soul, she said.

    Some of the men have mommy issues, too.

    “I have this one man,” Ms. Weinberg said, “whose mother used to be a ballerina, so he is looking for a woman with long legs, no chest. And he’s a rabbi!”

    Ms. Weinberg will work with any client as long as he or she is Jewish by the traditional standard of maternal descent: “I work with everyone whose mother is Jewish. The father could be the pope.” And she will work with clients who are gay, as long as they are looking for a straight marriage.

    “They have same-sex attraction,” Ms. Weinberg said, “but they don’t want to pursue that line. They want to marry a woman, and they want me to tell the girls they are homosexual but they don’t want to act on it.” Such a man “wants to have a normal house; he wants a house and a family.”

    And even for these men, Ms. Weinberg said, there are women.

    “I have to tell the woman” about the man’s situation, she said. “But there are women who are asexual, and there are women who don’t need to be — hugged and kissed, sure, but. ” She trailed off. “I have made matches like that.”

    Ms. Weinberg will take extraordinary measures to help put a man and woman together for life. She told one of her sons she would give him $10,000 if he found a husband for his sister, and he did. She will also take certain liberties in the service of love.

    “Something you should know about Tova is she creatively alters the truth under certain circumstances,” said Beverly Siegel. a documentary filmmaker from Chicago. Widowed after a long first marriage, Ms. Siegel met her second husband through Ms. Weinberg.

    “She told Howard some things about me that were not exactly true,” Ms. Siegel said. “She told him that I was 55, but I was 59. She told him I was willing to relocate. Howard was living in New York at the time. My feeling was when you say you are willing to relocate, it’s a matter of how much, it’s a negotiation. But she just said, ‘She’s willing to relocate.’ Period.”

    Ms. Weinberg also told Ms. Siegel that her prospective date, Howard Rieger, was “the most important Jew in North America.” Mr. Rieger was the president of United Jewish Communities, a national philanthropy, and so was one very important Jew. But Ms. Siegel now finds that description a bit dubious.

    “I think it’s safe to say he wasn’t the most important Jew in North America,” Ms. Siegel said of her second husband. But they were married in September 2008, five months after they started emailing, four months after their first date.

    “Tova is an amazingly talented woman,” Ms. Siegel said. “She is obsessed in a wonderful way.”

    A version of this article appears in print on August 16, 2014, on page A20 of the New York edition with the headline: A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe