Singulair oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings – Dosing #denmark #dating #site


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Singulair

GENERIC NAME(S): MONTELUKAST SODIUM

Uses

Montelukast is used regularly to prevent the wheezing and shortness of breath caused by asthma and decrease the number of asthma attacks. Montelukast is also used before exercise to prevent breathing problems during exercise (bronchospasm). This medication can help decrease the number of times you need to use your rescue inhaler. This medication is also used to relieve symptoms of hay fever and allergic rhinitis (such as sneezing. stuffy/runny/itchy nose).

This medication does not work right away and should not be used to treat sudden asthma attacks or other breathing problems.

This drug works by blocking certain natural substances (leukotrienes) that may cause or worsen asthma and allergies. It helps make breathing easier by reducing swelling (inflammation ) in the airways.

How to use Singulair

Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking montelukast and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. If you are using the chewable tablets, chew them thoroughly before swallowing. If your child cannot safely chew and swallow them, consult the doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Take this medication at the same time each day. If you are taking this medication for asthma or for both asthma and allergies. take your dose in the evening. If you are taking montelukast to prevent only allergies. take your dose either in the morning or the evening.

If you are taking this medication to prevent breathing problems during exercise, take your dose at least 2 hours before exercise. Do not take more than one dose in 24 hours. Do not take a dose before exercise if you are already taking this medication daily for asthma or allergies. Doing so may increase the risk of side effects.

Do not increase or decrease your dose or stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Continue to use this medication regularly to keep your asthma under control, even during sudden asthma attacks or periods when you have no asthma symptoms. Continue to also take other medications for asthma as directed by your doctor. This medication works over time and is not meant to relieve sudden attacks of asthma. Therefore, if an asthma attack or other breathing problem occurs, use your quick-relief inhaler as prescribed. You should always have a quick-relief inhaler with you. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Get medical help right away if your asthma symptoms worsen and your quick-relief inhaler is not helping. Tell your doctor promptly if asthma symptoms, breathing problems, allergy symptoms. number of times you use your rescue inhaler persist or worsen.

Side Effects

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, aggression, anxiety. trouble sleeping. abnormal dreams. sleep -walking, memory/attention problems, depression. hallucinations. thoughts of harming yourself/suicide ), numbness/tingling/shooting pain in the arms or legs, sinus pain/swelling, muscle weakness .

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat), severe dizziness. trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking montelukast, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this drug, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

The chewable tablets may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid aspartame (or phenylalanine ) in your diet, ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this medication safely.

During pregnancy. this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast -feeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: thirst, drowsiness, inability to keep still, vomiting. or severe stomach pain .

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as lung /breathing test) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up. Do not take more than 1 dose in 24 hours.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

MEDICAL ALERT: Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-888-633-4298 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada).

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

Images


Singulair Uses, Dosage – Side Effects #chatrooms


#singler

#

Singulair

What is Singulair?

Singulair (montelukast) is a leukotriene (loo-koe-TRY-een) inhibitor. Leukotrienes are chemicals your body releases when you breathe in an allergen (such as pollen). These chemicals cause swelling in your lungs and tightening of the muscles around your airways, which can result in asthma symptoms.

Singulair is used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children as young as 12 months old. Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Singulair is also used to treat symptoms of year-round (perennial) allergies in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. It is also used to treat symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children who are at least 2 years old.

Do not give this medicine to a child without a doctor’s advice.

Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the air passages in the lungs) in adults and teenagers who are at least 15 years old and are not already taking this medicine for other conditions.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use an extra dose to treat exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Important information

Singulair will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack that has already begun. Use only a fast-acting inhalation medicine to treat an asthma attack. Talk with your doctor if any of your asthma medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing attacks.

Call your doctor right away if you feel that this medicine is not working as well as usual, or if it makes your condition worse. If it seems like you need to use more of any of your medications in a 24-hour period, talk with your doctor.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use it for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Call your doctor at once if you have any mood or behavior changes, anxiety, depression, or thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Singulair if you are allergic to montelukast.

To make sure Singulair is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

asthma, or a history of severe allergic reaction to aspirin.

The chewable tablet may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of montelukast if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Singulair is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether montelukast passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Singulair?

Take Singulair exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Singulair is usually taken once daily in the evening for prevention of asthma or allergy symptoms. For exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, take a single dose at least 2 hours before you exercise, and do not take another dose for at least 24 hours. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Singulair is not a rescue medicine. It will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack. Use only a fast acting inhalation medicine for an asthma attack. Tell your doctor if it seems like your asthma medications don’t work as well.

Swallow the regular tablet whole, with a glass of water.

The Singulair chewable tablet must be chewed completely before you swallow it.

The oral granules can be placed directly into the mouth and swallowed, or mixed with a spoonful of applesauce, mashed carrots, rice, or ice cream. Oral granules can also be mixed with 1 teaspoon of baby formula or breast milk. Do not use any other type of liquid for mixing the granules. Other liquids can be taken before or after taking the medicine.

After opening or mixing the oral granules, you must use them within 15 minutes. Do not save an open packet or mixed medicine for later use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

If you also take a steroid asthma medicine, do not stop using it suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Asthma is usually treated with a combination of drugs. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice, even if you have no asthma symptoms.

Store Singulair at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not open a packet of oral granules until you are ready to use the medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Singulair?

Avoid situations or activities that may trigger an asthma attack.

If your asthma symptoms get worse when you take aspirin, avoid taking aspirin or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) while you are taking Singulair. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

Singulair side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Singulair: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

unusual changes in mood or behavior;

skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;

ear pain, swelling, or warmth; or

severe skin reaction–fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common Singulair side effects may include:

stomach pain, diarrhea;

fever or other flu symptoms;

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, cough, sore throat;

bed-wetting or loss of bladder control in children.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Singulair?

Other drugs may interact with montelukast, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about Singulair (montelukast)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about Singulair.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Singulair only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2016 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 13.01. Revision Date: 2014-12-23, 3:07:24 PM.

Drug Status


Singulair oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings – Dosing #online #christian #dating


#singler

#

Singulair

GENERIC NAME(S): MONTELUKAST SODIUM

Uses

Montelukast is used regularly to prevent the wheezing and shortness of breath caused by asthma and decrease the number of asthma attacks. Montelukast is also used before exercise to prevent breathing problems during exercise (bronchospasm). This medication can help decrease the number of times you need to use your rescue inhaler. This medication is also used to relieve symptoms of hay fever and allergic rhinitis (such as sneezing. stuffy/runny/itchy nose).

This medication does not work right away and should not be used to treat sudden asthma attacks or other breathing problems.

This drug works by blocking certain natural substances (leukotrienes) that may cause or worsen asthma and allergies. It helps make breathing easier by reducing swelling (inflammation ) in the airways.

How to use Singulair

Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking montelukast and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. If you are using the chewable tablets, chew them thoroughly before swallowing. If your child cannot safely chew and swallow them, consult the doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Take this medication at the same time each day. If you are taking this medication for asthma or for both asthma and allergies. take your dose in the evening. If you are taking montelukast to prevent only allergies. take your dose either in the morning or the evening.

If you are taking this medication to prevent breathing problems during exercise, take your dose at least 2 hours before exercise. Do not take more than one dose in 24 hours. Do not take a dose before exercise if you are already taking this medication daily for asthma or allergies. Doing so may increase the risk of side effects.

Do not increase or decrease your dose or stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Continue to use this medication regularly to keep your asthma under control, even during sudden asthma attacks or periods when you have no asthma symptoms. Continue to also take other medications for asthma as directed by your doctor. This medication works over time and is not meant to relieve sudden attacks of asthma. Therefore, if an asthma attack or other breathing problem occurs, use your quick-relief inhaler as prescribed. You should always have a quick-relief inhaler with you. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Get medical help right away if your asthma symptoms worsen and your quick-relief inhaler is not helping. Tell your doctor promptly if asthma symptoms, breathing problems, allergy symptoms. number of times you use your rescue inhaler persist or worsen.

Side Effects

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, aggression, anxiety. trouble sleeping. abnormal dreams. sleep -walking, memory/attention problems, depression. hallucinations. thoughts of harming yourself/suicide ), numbness/tingling/shooting pain in the arms or legs, sinus pain/swelling, muscle weakness .

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat), severe dizziness. trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking montelukast, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this drug, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

The chewable tablets may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid aspartame (or phenylalanine ) in your diet, ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this medication safely.

During pregnancy. this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast -feeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: thirst, drowsiness, inability to keep still, vomiting. or severe stomach pain .

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as lung /breathing test) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up. Do not take more than 1 dose in 24 hours.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

MEDICAL ALERT: Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-888-633-4298 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada).

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

Images


Singulair Uses, Dosage – Side Effects #dating #40


#singler

#

Singulair

What is Singulair?

Singulair (montelukast) is a leukotriene (loo-koe-TRY-een) inhibitor. Leukotrienes are chemicals your body releases when you breathe in an allergen (such as pollen). These chemicals cause swelling in your lungs and tightening of the muscles around your airways, which can result in asthma symptoms.

Singulair is used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children as young as 12 months old. Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Singulair is also used to treat symptoms of year-round (perennial) allergies in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. It is also used to treat symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children who are at least 2 years old.

Do not give this medicine to a child without a doctor’s advice.

Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the air passages in the lungs) in adults and teenagers who are at least 15 years old and are not already taking this medicine for other conditions.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use an extra dose to treat exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Important information

Singulair will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack that has already begun. Use only a fast-acting inhalation medicine to treat an asthma attack. Talk with your doctor if any of your asthma medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing attacks.

Call your doctor right away if you feel that this medicine is not working as well as usual, or if it makes your condition worse. If it seems like you need to use more of any of your medications in a 24-hour period, talk with your doctor.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use it for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Call your doctor at once if you have any mood or behavior changes, anxiety, depression, or thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Singulair if you are allergic to montelukast.

To make sure Singulair is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

asthma, or a history of severe allergic reaction to aspirin.

The chewable tablet may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of montelukast if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Singulair is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether montelukast passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Singulair?

Take Singulair exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Singulair is usually taken once daily in the evening for prevention of asthma or allergy symptoms. For exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, take a single dose at least 2 hours before you exercise, and do not take another dose for at least 24 hours. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Singulair is not a rescue medicine. It will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack. Use only a fast acting inhalation medicine for an asthma attack. Tell your doctor if it seems like your asthma medications don’t work as well.

Swallow the regular tablet whole, with a glass of water.

The Singulair chewable tablet must be chewed completely before you swallow it.

The oral granules can be placed directly into the mouth and swallowed, or mixed with a spoonful of applesauce, mashed carrots, rice, or ice cream. Oral granules can also be mixed with 1 teaspoon of baby formula or breast milk. Do not use any other type of liquid for mixing the granules. Other liquids can be taken before or after taking the medicine.

After opening or mixing the oral granules, you must use them within 15 minutes. Do not save an open packet or mixed medicine for later use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

If you also take a steroid asthma medicine, do not stop using it suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Asthma is usually treated with a combination of drugs. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice, even if you have no asthma symptoms.

Store Singulair at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not open a packet of oral granules until you are ready to use the medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Singulair?

Avoid situations or activities that may trigger an asthma attack.

If your asthma symptoms get worse when you take aspirin, avoid taking aspirin or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) while you are taking Singulair. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

Singulair side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Singulair: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

unusual changes in mood or behavior;

skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;

ear pain, swelling, or warmth; or

severe skin reaction–fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common Singulair side effects may include:

stomach pain, diarrhea;

fever or other flu symptoms;

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, cough, sore throat;

bed-wetting or loss of bladder control in children.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Singulair?

Other drugs may interact with montelukast, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about Singulair (montelukast)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about Singulair.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Singulair only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2016 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 13.01. Revision Date: 2014-12-23, 3:07:24 PM.

Drug Status


Singulair oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings – Dosing #dating #sites #for #free


#singler

#

Singulair

GENERIC NAME(S): MONTELUKAST SODIUM

Uses

Montelukast is used regularly to prevent the wheezing and shortness of breath caused by asthma and decrease the number of asthma attacks. Montelukast is also used before exercise to prevent breathing problems during exercise (bronchospasm). This medication can help decrease the number of times you need to use your rescue inhaler. This medication is also used to relieve symptoms of hay fever and allergic rhinitis (such as sneezing. stuffy/runny/itchy nose).

This medication does not work right away and should not be used to treat sudden asthma attacks or other breathing problems.

This drug works by blocking certain natural substances (leukotrienes) that may cause or worsen asthma and allergies. It helps make breathing easier by reducing swelling (inflammation ) in the airways.

How to use Singulair

Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking montelukast and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. If you are using the chewable tablets, chew them thoroughly before swallowing. If your child cannot safely chew and swallow them, consult the doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Take this medication at the same time each day. If you are taking this medication for asthma or for both asthma and allergies. take your dose in the evening. If you are taking montelukast to prevent only allergies. take your dose either in the morning or the evening.

If you are taking this medication to prevent breathing problems during exercise, take your dose at least 2 hours before exercise. Do not take more than one dose in 24 hours. Do not take a dose before exercise if you are already taking this medication daily for asthma or allergies. Doing so may increase the risk of side effects.

Do not increase or decrease your dose or stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Continue to use this medication regularly to keep your asthma under control, even during sudden asthma attacks or periods when you have no asthma symptoms. Continue to also take other medications for asthma as directed by your doctor. This medication works over time and is not meant to relieve sudden attacks of asthma. Therefore, if an asthma attack or other breathing problem occurs, use your quick-relief inhaler as prescribed. You should always have a quick-relief inhaler with you. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Get medical help right away if your asthma symptoms worsen and your quick-relief inhaler is not helping. Tell your doctor promptly if asthma symptoms, breathing problems, allergy symptoms. number of times you use your rescue inhaler persist or worsen.

Side Effects

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, aggression, anxiety. trouble sleeping. abnormal dreams. sleep -walking, memory/attention problems, depression. hallucinations. thoughts of harming yourself/suicide ), numbness/tingling/shooting pain in the arms or legs, sinus pain/swelling, muscle weakness .

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat), severe dizziness. trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking montelukast, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this drug, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

The chewable tablets may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid aspartame (or phenylalanine ) in your diet, ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this medication safely.

During pregnancy. this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast -feeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: thirst, drowsiness, inability to keep still, vomiting. or severe stomach pain .

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as lung /breathing test) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up. Do not take more than 1 dose in 24 hours.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

MEDICAL ALERT: Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-888-633-4298 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada).

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

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Singulair Uses, Dosage – Side Effects #christain #dating


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Singulair

What is Singulair?

Singulair (montelukast) is a leukotriene (loo-koe-TRY-een) inhibitor. Leukotrienes are chemicals your body releases when you breathe in an allergen (such as pollen). These chemicals cause swelling in your lungs and tightening of the muscles around your airways, which can result in asthma symptoms.

Singulair is used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children as young as 12 months old. Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Singulair is also used to treat symptoms of year-round (perennial) allergies in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. It is also used to treat symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children who are at least 2 years old.

Do not give this medicine to a child without a doctor’s advice.

Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the air passages in the lungs) in adults and teenagers who are at least 15 years old and are not already taking this medicine for other conditions.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use an extra dose to treat exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Important information

Singulair will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack that has already begun. Use only a fast-acting inhalation medicine to treat an asthma attack. Talk with your doctor if any of your asthma medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing attacks.

Call your doctor right away if you feel that this medicine is not working as well as usual, or if it makes your condition worse. If it seems like you need to use more of any of your medications in a 24-hour period, talk with your doctor.

If you already take Singulair to prevent asthma or allergy symptoms, do not use it for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Call your doctor at once if you have any mood or behavior changes, anxiety, depression, or thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Singulair if you are allergic to montelukast.

To make sure Singulair is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

asthma, or a history of severe allergic reaction to aspirin.

The chewable tablet may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of montelukast if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Singulair is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether montelukast passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Singulair?

Take Singulair exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Singulair is usually taken once daily in the evening for prevention of asthma or allergy symptoms. For exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, take a single dose at least 2 hours before you exercise, and do not take another dose for at least 24 hours. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Singulair is not a rescue medicine. It will not work fast enough to treat an asthma attack. Use only a fast acting inhalation medicine for an asthma attack. Tell your doctor if it seems like your asthma medications don’t work as well.

Swallow the regular tablet whole, with a glass of water.

The Singulair chewable tablet must be chewed completely before you swallow it.

The oral granules can be placed directly into the mouth and swallowed, or mixed with a spoonful of applesauce, mashed carrots, rice, or ice cream. Oral granules can also be mixed with 1 teaspoon of baby formula or breast milk. Do not use any other type of liquid for mixing the granules. Other liquids can be taken before or after taking the medicine.

After opening or mixing the oral granules, you must use them within 15 minutes. Do not save an open packet or mixed medicine for later use.

It may take up to several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Singulair as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after several weeks of treatment.

If you also take a steroid asthma medicine, do not stop using it suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Asthma is usually treated with a combination of drugs. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice, even if you have no asthma symptoms.

Store Singulair at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not open a packet of oral granules until you are ready to use the medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Singulair?

Avoid situations or activities that may trigger an asthma attack.

If your asthma symptoms get worse when you take aspirin, avoid taking aspirin or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) while you are taking Singulair. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

Singulair side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Singulair: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

unusual changes in mood or behavior;

skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;

ear pain, swelling, or warmth; or

severe skin reaction–fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common Singulair side effects may include:

stomach pain, diarrhea;

fever or other flu symptoms;

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, cough, sore throat;

bed-wetting or loss of bladder control in children.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Singulair?

Other drugs may interact with montelukast, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about Singulair (montelukast)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about Singulair.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Singulair only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2016 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 13.01. Revision Date: 2014-12-23, 3:07:24 PM.

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